Find a new Favorite Author

Dear friends,

My journey along the path of independent authorship has been one of the most rewarding of my life. I believe that creating a world for others to enjoy is one of the most satisfying things a creative artist can do.

My world is the world of Shig Sato, a fictional retired police officer in Tokyo in the early 1990s. Many of you have told me how much you like Shig and his stories. The next adventure, Cat’s Meow, is coming along a little slower than I want, but I still plan on having it available this year.

In the mean time, I’ve met a lot of people who, like me, like to write mysteries and thrillers. And one of the things we all agree on is: we like to share our works and give readers a chance to find us.

In that spirit, author giveaways have become a popular tool for finding new readers. I am participating in two at the moment, one that includes Shig Sato No. 2, The Thief’s Mistake, and the other that includes Shig Sato No. 3, Traitors & Lies. But it’s not just my book that’s available at no cost. There are dozens of others available to chose from.

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To discover 47 authors – at no cost to you – through Book Deals Today, just click

You’ll be able to download a month’s worth of entertainment straight from Instafreebie.

If you prefer to use Book Funnel, then check this out

Book Funnel August

and just click here for even more great reads! Cozier stories, and just the right amount of murder.

And if you like what you read, give the author some love and write a review on Amazon, Goodreads, or contact the author and let them know how much you enjoy their work. These happy surprises can make an author’s day, believe me!

These offers end soon, so don’t miss out. It’s not too late to grab your next weekend read!

Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Kurt Wallander and Japan Noir and you have a new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s Mistake, or Traitors & Lies – and to read how it all began. To find out more about the World of Shig Sato, sign up for a periodic newsletter. All you have to do is click here – and you can get a copy of The Gangster’s Son for free.

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Japan & Espionage: Shig Sato wasn’t the first to fall into a trap

KGB. GRU. CIA. The Cold War. It’s the stuff of thrilling writing. But do you know the story behind the story?

In Traitors & Lies, Tokyo’s reluctant P.I., Shig Sato, finds himself entangled in high-stakes international espionage in early 1990s Tokyo. It doesn’t take long for Shig to realize he’s been lied to, and might just be a pawn in the biggest power grab in the Cold War.

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(AP photos)

But they say truth is stranger than fiction. It’s certainly the case with one of my favorite authors, Ian Fleming, and the story behind You Only Live Twice. This article that ran in The Japan Times, one of my old newspaper haunts, explains why. Read the fascinating story here.

To find out what it takes for Shig Sato to come to his senses about Katsuo Takahashi, and his new life as a private investigator, pick up a copy of Traitor’s & Lies.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Kurt Wallander and Japan Noir and you have a new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s Son, The Thief’s Mistake, or Traitors & Lies – and to read how it all began. To find out more about the World of Shig Sato, sign up for a periodic newsletter. All you have to do is click here.

 

20 Unknown Authors You Should Know About

Here are some unknown authors you should know about, including me, from a post that originally appeared in Medium, by Rutankhamen.

There are a lot of authors out there, and it’s understandably hard to pick which one to engage with, so I’ve decided to help you out.

This list features authors across many genres, from different countries and with as varied personal stories as they come.

All have agreed to answer a set of questions just for you so, without further ado, lets read their answers. Enjoy!

Joseph Mark Brewer

Joseph Mark Brewer
He’s a writer from Hamilton, Ohio, who’s been working in the news business for over 35 years. He started writing in elementary school, and believes that everyone has a story to tell. His inspiration? The stories themselves.
Joseph has an exclusive prequel novella to his series, and it’s available to all newsletter subscribers. Get it here.
He’s always written fiction and plans to do so in the future, even after he leaves the news business. He has 12 novels in all for the Shig Sato series, and is preparing a new series featuring an ex-Navy SEAL bounty hunter who returns to his hometown to discover trouble is following him no matter where he goes. We can’t wait!

When asked if he had anything juicy to tell readers, he said no, sadly.

His motto: Never explain, never complain. Just write a story about it.
I love it and might borrow it from time to time, as motivation wanes and waxes.

Interesting interaction with a reader: He says he loves reading reviews, as they often point out things he has never considered before. He also takes thoughtful critique seriously, which is a nice thing to do as an author.

Favourite book out of everything he’s written: The Gangster’s Son, book 1 in the Shig Sato series.

His message to the readers: If you like international settings and gritty crime, discover the world of Shig Sato.

You can find him here:
http://www.josephmarkbrewer.com
Facebook @josephmarkbrewer
Twitter Joseph Mark Brewer

Lyn Alexander (photo from her Amazon page)

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The Hunt is On

An unexpected phone call and the suspicions of Mrs. Abe’s ramen delivery boy put Sato and Abe on the trail of a killer

from The Gangster’s Son – A Shig Sato Mystery

Sato sat at his desk, fanning himself with a thin white and red paper fan that looked like a heart on a small handle, and waited for the dull buzz in his head to die down. Ses Fujimori, Kazuo Takahashi, Mai Sakamoto, the superintendent general, Michiko Hayashi: voices roiling in his head, and all he saw was Kimi Yamada’s beaten face, and Miki’s weak smile beneath her oxygen mask. He stared at his desk, fanned himself, and kept thinking of everything, and nothing.

Then Abe’s phone rang.

“Damn,” he thought. “Will this never end?”

After a deep breath and long exhale, he walked to Abe’s desk, wondering what else could interfere with the investigation.

“This is Sato.”

“Oh, Inspector!”

okinawa-646182_1920Mrs. Abe seemed startled to hear a voice other than her son’s. But she recovered quickly, and her words fell like a waterfall. Before he was aware of it, Sato was settling in to listen to whatever Abe’s mother had to say, trying to ease into a state where he could endure the harmless diversion.

But he heard anxiety in the old woman’s voice as she hoarsely whispered that since she was talking to Inspector Sato himself, she had to share something she heard from one of the delivery boys. She explained how Taki made deliveries for old Kamiya’s brasserie, Mr. Edano’s sobu shop, Mrs. Fukuyama’s tempura shop, and of course, Abe’s ramen shop. The delivery “boys” were, as Sato well knew, old men. Taki, for example, was gray as a dirty raincloud, with yellowed teeth and milky eyes, and was stubborn beyond reason. But they delivered the food and collected the dishes, and the system worked. One of the side benefits of using the delivery boys was learning the latest gossip.

Sato sighed, not wanting to interrupt Mrs. Abe.

“And Taki is a one-man neighborhood watch. One place he doesn’t like is an ugly old place two streets over. It’s filled with the worst sort of people. Like today,” she said.

“Taki says a ‘young punk up to no good’ is there off and on, with one of those noisy motorbikes, you know the kind, and sometimes he’s there with women, and sometimes with girls not even high school age, and the most loathsome creatures stopping by day and night, not staying long. I wonder why Ken never told you about it. Well, sometimes this person orders food and sometimes beer or something even stronger, and sometimes there’s an odor. Taki thinks it smells like one of those opium dens. Not that I would know. But Taki says there has to be something illegal going on.”

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Stories, writing, and Nothing But The Truth

CrookedInterviewImageCROOKED INTERVIEW with Joseph Mark Brewer

BY ANITA KOVACEVIC ON 21/04/2017

This is an author who will draw you into his exotic world of the Shig Sato mysteries with ease and elegance. It gives me great joy to have Joseph Mark Brewer over as my guest today, chatting about his short story Nothing But The Truth in Crooked Tales, as well as his other books.
Author’s bio

From an early age, Joseph Mark Brewer loved travel and learning about the world. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy as a journalist and spent the next four years on sea duty, serving on ships that would allow him to visit more than 40 cities around the world. His three years based in Japan and subsequent time working as a journalist in Tokyo forms the foundation of an interest in that country that continues today.  

Interview


CrookedCoverWhat is your Crooked tale about and what inspired it?

  1. My Crooked Tales story is a sort of morality tale: neglected kids, broken homes, and witnesses keeping to themselves, for whatever reason.

What do you like writing and/or reading best? 

  1. I like reading best. Reading is the well from which my writing emerges.

What else do you do in life apart from writing?

  1. I work in the news business, and am a historian by nature/inclination. I spend as much time reading history and biography as I do literature, or mysteries, or even writing my own stories.

What are you currently working on?

  1. These days I am writing the next three books in the Shig Sato series, and shaping the outline of another trilogy quite different from Shig.

Crooked Interview – My 5 questions for myself:


What interests do you have besides writing and history? 

I developed an interest in the world and travel at an early age, and was fortunate enough to indulge in that before finishing my university education. I don’t travel as much as I’d like these days, but hope to resume that interest someday soon.

Why did you set your Shig Sato mysteries in Japan?

 I had no notion or interest in Japan until I was stationed there while serving in the U.S. Navy. But I grew to like the country’s art, literature, and music. And living in a culture so different from my own, I found similarities all humans share. I think this gave me confidence to write, and to write about people no matter their background or situation. All human emotion is the same.

How did you come to write a mystery series?

 Again, I surprised myself, in that when I took stock of what I like to read, and what type of story I wanted to write to convey some of my feelings about Japan and its culture, I found that a mystery series suited my purpose. I’ve always been a Sherlock Holmes fan, love Agatha Christy, and am drawn to noir and thriller books and films. I found it intriguiing to create that world to say what I wanted.

You worked as a journalist in the Navy. Did that influence your writing? 

 I think it helped me decide that that I could earning a living in the news business and learn how to write. I have worked for newspapers for almost 30 years. It’s a great way to learn how to write and edit. 

How is writing a mystery novel the same or different from writing for news media? 

It’s similar in that facts matter, and that a certain logical sequence has to be followed. Answering who, what, when, where, why is a good starting point. The main difference is in length. The challenge in writing a 60,000 word mystery is sustaining the narrative and holding the reader’s interest. Very few news stories, or longer pieces in magazines, are book- length. Learning how to do that was quite an adjustment. 

Joe’s new project is Tokyo Summer, a Shig Sato Novella. It’s a prequel to The Gangster’s Son, the first in his #ShigSato mystery series. ssnovella1

The blurb for Tokyo Summer:

It was classified as an overdose. Or was it?


Setsuko Usami, the wife of a top Bank of Japan economist, is found dead in her bathroom. The police report points to an accidental drug overdose. Government officials want to keep the death under wraps to avoid scandal. But when the toxicology report arrives, it points to murder.


Despite his independent streak and reputation for turning down promotions, the bureaucrats in government and at the Tokyo Police headquarters know there’s only one man for the job: Inspector Shig Sato. He re-opens the case and follows the clues. What he discovers is more shocking than any official can imagine.


Will Sato bend to the will of his superiors and keep the case quiet, or will Sato go the distance to catch a killer?

Because someone just might get away with murder.

MARK FINE’S QUESTIONS for other Crooked Tales authors

Do you find a silver lining in a bad review? If so, please give an example.

— I had one reviewer complain about the mistakes and errors and such, and I went back and had to sheepishly admit to myself that I had missed a lot of small things in the final edit. Let that be a lesson: Even an editor needs an editor.

What percentage of the research you do for a novel actually lands up on the printed page?

— Not much, but the Shig Sato series will eventually be 12 volumes. A lot of what I’m researching now, facts and answers to questions I have, and reviewing things I’d forgotten, will eventually make it into the series.

Do you have an author you admire? If so, why?  

— Patrick O’Brian, the author of the “Master and Commander”  Aubrey/Maturin series. What he created — the British Royal Navy during the time of the Napoleonic Wars — and the characters, settings, adventures, plot twists, naval engagement, world travel, history, natural science; it’s simply a masterpiece. I found myself rereading the series five times, and realized about the third time through that what I was doing was learning how to write a series from him. I regard that series as the how-to for anyone who wants to write a series, regardless of genre.  

Question for authors from Joe Brewer:

Who is your favorite story or character or author  from literature – any genre-  Why?

Does that story/character/author help you in your writing process?

Tokyo Summer is available at Amazon. All you have to do is click here.

For your copy of Crooked Tales, click here.

You can find Joe’s other books here.

The INFP Writing Personality: Elegant Persuasion

Andrea J. Wenger, Author

Everyone needs to be valued. Everyone has the potential
to give something back.
—Diana, Princess of Wales

Have you ever wondered whether your personality affects your writing style?

If you’re an INFP writer, chances are, the answer is yes.  INFPs have a natural aptitude for writing. In exploring this solitary pursuit, you can communicate your deeply held values and experiment with elegant, inventive uses of language. But you may find that formal approaches taught in writing classes don’t seem to work for you. Composing an opening paragraph may prove impossible until you’ve fleshed out the major ideas. Developing an outline may turn a pleasurable activity into an intolerable one—and your zest for the topic may wither away. INFPs write best when their imagination is unfettered.

The INFP personality type is one of 16 identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, a popular psychometric instrument used to determine how people prefer…

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