Book Review Wednesday – The Coelho Medallion

The book-a-week challenge continues with  The Coelho Medallion, by Kevin Tumlinson.

coelhoIf there’s one thing an archaeologist likes it’s a good dig. The promise of hidden treasure or a historical find that spurs them on. Some do it to satisfy their insatiable thirst for knowledge. Some, for monetary gain. Others, for fame.

But what about terror?

The Coelho Medallion was discovered at a Pueblo research site and is revered as a link to a discovery that has captured the nation’s imagination: the Vikings’ arrival in North America long before Columbus, and that somehow they trekked far inland, where they built a city of gold.

But now the medallion has been stolen. A linguist has been kidnapped. And a sinister terrorist plot has been set in motion.

Dan Kotler, an independent researcher well-connected in the archaeology community, makes it his business to find his kidnapped friend. But before he takes a step he has to deal with the FBI, terrorists, an egomaniacal billionaire, and danger that comes in many forms: all of this before he discovers a plot that may kill thousands, if not millions, and the comes to realize the real city of gold. Kotler is a hero who is easy to like, a James Bond-type who lives by his wits and isn’t afraid to put himself in harm’s way. He’s smart and quick and convincing: handy attributes for a hero. Tumlinson has a winner here. Now with five books in the Dan Kotler series, I’m sure his fans agree.

The Coelho Medallion is an action/thriller with elements of history, archeology and real-world geopolitical consequences. It’s easy to believe this story could happen. It could be happening right now.

And it’s easy to tell from his writing that Kevin Tumlinson loves his subject. And he keeps the action coming. The plot twists are timely and surprising and will keep the reader turning the page. Tumlinson is a thorough writer — at times a bit too thorough — in laying out what’s happening, what the character is thinking, the ins and outs and possibilities of what’s to come, or might come. Tumlinson has a lot of threads to keep track of in this story and he does a good job of keeping track of them all. The Coelho Medallion is a smart tale and a clever one, and it’s easy to understand the appeal to readers who like historic/action-adventure thrillers.

The Coelho Medallion, by Kevin Tumlinson. Book 1 in the Dan Kotler Archaeological Thriller Series.

4 stars out of 5

Available at Amazon as ebook, paperback, and audiobook, and at Barnes and Noble as a paperback.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Book Review Wednesday – Return to Hiroshima

The book-a-week challenge continues with  Return to Hiroshima, by Bob Van Laerhoven.

 

“Memory is a monstrous thing.”

 

HiroshimacoverIt is the memory of events real or imagined that accelerates Bob Van Laerhoven’s grisly Return to Hiroshima to the first rank of macabre noir. Return to Hiroshima could stand alone as a work of horror. Or post-apocalyptic dystopia. Hiroshima since August 6, 1945, certainly qualifies.

Van Laerhoven’s mastery of his subject and his flawless maneuvering through Japan’s unique past make one forget the depth of his narrative. There are many layers to Return to Hiroshima, and Van Laerhoven’s gift is crafting many intriguing subplots to create an energetic whole. But ‘layered’ is not quite right. Like an iceberg, a predictable part of Japan is visible for anyone to see. But beneath the surface lies mortal danger. And Van Laerhoven bravely plumbs those depths, for what’s underneath is a separate universe. What’s unsaid. What’s unaccounted for. Secrets no one admits to. Furious, revengeful rages hide beneath cool facades. Unspoken but understood conspiracies feed quests to right ultimate wrongs.

But whose catastrophe? Which people? Ultimately, Return to Hiroshima is a thriller, set in motion by a tormented woman determined to escape her past, explaining away her grotesqueness by being a daughter of hibakusha – survivors of the atom bombing. By a Belgian man who returns to Japan to come to grips with the death of his sister. By a Japanese son of privilege bent on sadistic pleasure. By a tortured half-Dutch, half-Japanese police inspector who cannot reconcile his past. By a criminal overlord determined to resurrect Japan’s past glories. And what propels Van Laerhoven’s narrative are the winds of Nationalism. Militarism. Nihilism. Anti-modernism. Mysticism. Myth.

“In the train to Hiroshima, I leaf through the old diaries I have taken with me from Hashima Island. On May 8th, 1988, I’d written: ‘Rokurobei hunts at night. Do not underestimate the demon’s power. When his victims hear his footsteps and see his long neck, it’s too late. He seduces if he can, kills if he must. Although his gentle nickname for me as a child was Aonyobo, a singing female spirit that haunts abandoned imperial palaces, it would be a mistake to overlook the Serpent Neck’s true nature, his capacity for violence.’”

There are times when myth and monsters are the only way to explain the inhumane in us all. And at the heart of Return to Hiroshima, longing turns violent, dreams morph into their own violent realities, and memories prove to be unworthy of trust. Yet the desire to return endures. To return. And return again. Memory is a monstrous thing, indeed.

Return to Hiroshima, by Bob Van Laerhoven, Crime Wave Press.

Five stars out of five.

Available at Amazon as ebook and paperback, at Barns & Noble as a paperback.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – The Dawn’s Early Light

The book-a-week challenge continues with The Dawn’s Early Light: A Mike Elliot Thriller Book 1, Revised Edition, by Lee F Duffy.

DawnsEarlyLightMajor Mike Elliot had drawn what seemed to be good duty, if one considers embassy duty in Tunisia good duty. At least he wasn’t a Special Forces operative anymore. He had enough of that, at too dear a cost.

Elliot had no way of knowing that organizing an evacuation of embassy personnel would lead to security breaches, dead Marines, a hijacking, and Elliot confronted with saving his wife, with him in Tunisia and now a hostage on the plane, while he remained bound and under the watchful eye of terrorists. He knows he has to act. But how?

Duffy places half the action is in Beirut at a time when it was the epicenter of worldwide terror watch, the other half in Cyprus, where he writes a nail-biting narrative too real to not be easily envisioned unfolding on cable news. He leaves no stone unturned: readers get a full dose of special ops, the chain of command, inter-service cooperation, international diplomacy, and the desperate, vengeful, hate-driven acts of terror that are a fact of life in our modern world.

Duffy is a former Army Green Beret and Ranger, and it shows. His attention to detail is extraordinary for any writer, but it’s what you’d expect from someone who wore the uniform and lived to tell tales. The Dawn’s Early Light grips your throat, shakes your attention, and doesn’t let go. Duffy provides enough military for the enthusiasts, enough tension for the thriller fans, and enough what’s-gonna-happen-next for anyone trying to outguess what Duffy has in store. Good luck with that.

The Dawn’s Early Light is the first book in the Mike Elliot Thriller series. Duffy has created a vivid character for our times. I can’t wait to read Book 2, Bombs Bursting in Air. I have to confess: I’ve had this ebook for almost two years in my reader. Everyone has lots to read and no time to read everything, but still. Shame on me for waiting so long. If you like military thrillers or want to take a chance on a new genre, read The Dawn’s Early Light. Don’t wait.

5 stars out of 5.

Available at Amazon  and Smashwords. You can find Duffy’s Amazon page here.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – Stolen Gypsy

The book-a-week challenge continues with  Stolen Gypsy by Elizabeth Horton-Newton.

stolengypsyTerza Blackstone never lived in on place long enough to make friends. Her parents never gave a second thought to uprooting her whenever they felt the need. Alone and friendless is never good, especially when being called to the principal’s office to be told your parents died in a crash while eluding police.

The authorities have lots of questions for 17-year-old Terza, but she has more. So it begins in Stolen Gypsy by Elizabeth Horton-Newton. The cops want to know if Terza knows anything about her parents’ activities. She wants to know just who were these people who raised her and why were they running from the law. When the feds step in to try to take charge of what seems to be a local crime, Terza becomes even more suspicious of what is happening, and although she escapes their grasp, she is forced to rely on strangers to help her find her answers.

Horton-Newton weaves a compelling thriller: Terza’s strength is her determination to get answers about her past, to find out who she is, and to make sense of the traumatic events that litter her young life. Equally determined are the two men who risk everything to keep her from harm, a county sheriff’s detective and charming Irishman with a penchant for saving girls in trouble. Terza discovers their help just might be what she needs to get her answers and her revenge. Terza’s parents were involved with serious, dangerous men. High stakes action, life-and-death consequences — this book has it all.

I have read Horton-Newton’s short fiction in Twisted Tales and Crooked Tales, anthologies published by Readers Circle of Avenue Park, and I am a fan. She has the gift of telling a good story, compelling a reader to keep turning the page, and just when you think you have it figured out — well, you don’t.  So you keep turning the page.

What more can a reader ask?

Stolen Gypsy, by Elizabeth Horton-Newton.

4.5 stars out of 5.

Available at Amazon.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Bluebonnets and Book Deals!

I wanted to check in with you to let you know what’s been happening. In a word: Lots! A lot of writing and planning the rest of the Shig Sato series. In a few weeks, I’ll have some chapters for you to peruse – and I love feedback! So don’t be shy about telling me what you think.

I’ve lived in Austin, Texas, for a little more than two years now and it’s been great. Right now is Texas Bluebonnet time. The wildflowers here are amazing, and one thing many people do is take their picture with bluebonnets.

Since I am definitely camera-averse, I’ll skip that part, but here’s a little something of what I mean. (photo courtesy Dallas Morning News)

bluebonnetDMN

Another thing that came up recently is the U.S. News & World Report Top Cities. Austin is No. 1 for the second year in a row. Here’s the link. I’ve lived in many cities thanks to my journalism career, including New York, Chicago, and Tokyo, and I can tell you Austin has it all on a scale that makes everything accessible and affordable. There’s a vibrant dining scene here, and the music is second to none. Come for a visit when you can!

Along with ‘mapping out’ the remaining Shig Sato mysteries, I have been posting book reviews on my blog. One review was for the Alex Vane media thriller The Anonymous Source by my friend A.C. Fuller. It’s a read I’d highly recommend. In fact, this Sunday, April 15, he’s having a sale on two of Alex Vane media thrillers – US and UK only. The Anonymous Source finds Alex in a media conspiracy that goes back to 9/11, and in The Inverted Pyramid, he attempts to untangle a web surrounding a dead hacker and an attempt to rig the 2004 election.

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Remember: Today! Sunday, April 15, one day only – each book will be 99 cents – just click!

In the meantime, be well and good reading.

All the best from me and Shig,

Joe

 

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – Connected: The Shift

The book-a-week challenge continues with Connected: The Shift by Michelle Medhat.

ShiftCoverConnected: The Shift is a continuation of Connected: The Call, Michelle Medhat’s excellent multilayered lightning-quick thriller that is so much more than spies and treachery. Together, the two books make for one long entertaining yarn, served in short, easily digestible chapters. I’m glad the books are offered one after the other. It gives a reader a chance to stop, take stock, breathe, and then jump in again after recovering. If you’re up for a long go, though, you won’t be disappointed.

Connected: The Shift has the horsepower to deliver the themes hinted at in The Call. What did Ellie Noor see that caused her to scream that day in March that caused her husband Sam to confess he’s an MI6 agent, and to raise alarms in the British intelligence community? Sam’s bosses fear Ellie is a spy, or at the very least an unreliable loose cannon, which is very bad timing for her. The UK and the USA are squaring off against a vicious terrorist group bent on world domination. This offers a cover for personal vendettas as well as state-sanctioned treachery. Ellie and Sam get their fill of both.

But it’s so much more than that, and that’s where Medhat’s brilliant recipe of history, science fiction, and suspense-thriller blossoms into an edge-of-your-chair race to the finish of the book. Really. I am nowhere near a sci-fi/alt universe/fantasy fan. I confess I don’t read much of what ‘s published these days because it doesn’t measure up to what I read in my long-ago youth. It’s probably an old saw, but it’s hard to beat Asimov, Bradbury, and Heinlein. But I am expanding my reach. And I am glad I took the plunge with the Connected books. The other-worldly (other universe) storyline, the techno-thriller and biological warfare themes of the book, are an integral part of The Shift. Medhat has created a universe of which Earth is only a small part, and the entire premise feels right and gives what’s a stake on Earth an extra dimension, or several. Take this plot out of the story and this thriller is so much less. Medhat strikes the right balance. And the ending is worth the ride.

4.5 stars out of 5.

Available at Amazon and Kobo in ebook format. Available at Amazon and Nook in paperback.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – The Girlfriend Experience

The book-a-week challenge continues with  The Girlfriend Experience (Matt Bugatti Book 1) by Charles O’Donnell.

ODonnel1Inside the mind of Dr. Matteo Bugatti lives the single-minded desire to break the internet’s most secure code. Which is fine for the naive computer wizard, until the NSA and the Chinese take an interest in his doings. The closer he gets to solving the riddle, the higher the stakes become. Not that he is aware of what’s going on around him until it’s too late, and breaking the code becomes a matter of life and death. For the genius Matt Bugatti, what he doesn’t know can kill him.

Charles O’Donnell has crafted a techno-thriller with enough elements to satisfy the demands of any fan of the genre: nefarious personalities, spy vs. spy, double dealings, temptation, betrayal, trust, and a plot that moves along at a pretty good clip despite a heavy load of deep computer technology that O’Donnell handles masterfully.

The last time I read what’s now called a techno-thriller was The Hunt for Red October, Tom Clancy’s debut novel. I liked it because I was in the navy and I’m fascinated by surface warfare and submarine technology. Fast-forward 30 years to The Girlfriend Experience. I have no love nor interest for code, software, hardware, or computer science in general, and I have to admit the details O’Donnell includes falls into the ‘skip over’ category of my reading, but that’s just me.

O’Donnell did not sacrifice technology for story, and for that I’m thankful. I am interested in what’s next for Matt Bugatti in Book 2, Moment of Conception. I’m looking forward to finding out.

The Girlfriend Experience, by Charles O’Donnell.

4 stars out of 5.

Available as ebook and paperback.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – Blind River

The book-a-week challenge continues with  Blind River, by Ben Follows.

BlindRiverThe last thing Curtis Mackley wants to do is go home to Blind River. An FBI agent, he chose the Bureau over home many years before. But a knock on his door and a summons from his partner, Frankie Lassiter, sends Mackley to his home town. One by one, local teenage girls have gone missing. The local police have asked the FBI for help.

The crimes are only the tip of the criminal iceberg in Blind River. Mackley and Lassiter’s hunt for the missing teens explodes into one crisis after another — more crimes, bloodshed, and vendettas than one town can endure. Mackley’s personal issues and the grief he finds there complicates what’s already a harrowing investigative experience.

About a third of the way into Blind River I went to its Amazon page to read some of the reviews. I could not believe it had (as of this writing) an average of 4.1 stars — 77 percent of the reviews are either five stars or four.

Blind River is a serial-killer murder mystery and a good yarn, and what appears in between the covers would make for a good movie or television series. But far too many things stand in the way of it being an enjoyable read. Follows shows no firm grasp on language or writing for the purpose of storytelling. There is a sense of the plot moving along scene by scene but it’s done carelessly. His descriptions are flat, and a limited vocabulary makes for lackluster reading. A Canadian, Fellows sets his story in New York but does not use American vernacular. His main character is “a fed” but the author shows no knowledge of titles or job responsibilities, procedural issues, or terminology.

Blind River is a clever whodunit with great twists and surprises, but it seems Fellows offered up what amounts to a first draft, with every typical error and mistake. It makes for very frustrating reading. At some point, I hope he uploads a clean version that addresses the many glaring issues. Blind River is a good story held back by a need for a polished and thoughtful revision.

I am breaking my own rule of never writing a review of less than three stars because clearly, Follows has talent. I want to read more of what he writes. But not if the other works are in the same condition as Blind River.

1.5 stars out of 5.

Available at Amazon as ebook and paperback.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

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Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – The Anonymous Source

The read-a-book-a-week challenge continues with A.C. Fuller’s The Anonymous Source, An Alex Vane Media Thriller.

AnonymousSourceA wealthy financier’s death is linked to tragedy surrounding Sept 11, 2001. An unimpressive, nondescript student is charged with the murder of an NYU professor, at one time a student of the financier. A mega-merger threatens to alter the media landscape, a merger fought tooth and nail by an anti-corporate activist with the vision to know that consolidating news organizations is bad for consumers, and losing net neutrality will doom free speech. That she manages to convince the financier to donate an improbably large donation to her watchdog group just weeks before his death seems improbable but this improbable decision is the hinge upon which the story swings to and fro.

A.C. Fuller’s The Anonymous Sources is a thriller that delivers: suspense, excitement, surprise, and an ongoing guessing-game of who is this Anonymous Source pivotal to the story. Alex Vane, the reporter with a nose for news and enough sense to challenge his editors when his editors stonewall, makes friends with Camila Gary, the ex-girlfriend of the murdered professor. The differences in their personalities and outlook, and the demons that fester within them make them an odd pair, but they work well together.

Fuller lays out clues like Hanzel and Gretel’s pebbles and breadcrumbs. Beneath the descriptive passages concerning newsgathering, source verification, the court system, traveling and dining in New York, an international assassin, travel to Hawaii, corrupt cops, New York sports, the tension and ambiguity between Alex and Camila, and the often tedious work of sorting facts and writing news, Fuller manages to keep his whodunit on track. His story moves back and forth in time, revealing small events that add to the greater whole, and the reader can follow the path to where the clues lead. There are just enough surprises to make the book interesting, and the characters relatable enough that I want to read more Alex Vane thrillers.

A.C. Fuller was a journalist and journalism professor before turning to writing thrillers full time. He knows his material. A wire service motto of long ago was ‘get it first, but get it right.’ As someone who still works in the newspaper business, I appreciate that he gets it right.

4 stars out of 5.

Available in all formats everywhere.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

NewAllBooks20184FB

Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting character in Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.

Book Review Wednesday – Faceless Killers – A Mystery (Kurt Wallander Mystery Book 1)

The read-a-book-a-week challenge continues with Faceless Killers.

FacelessKillersCoverHenning Mankell’s Faceless Killers brings to life Kurt Wallander, a detective in a small town in the south of Sweden who, on a frozen January morning, comes face to face with the grisly murder of an elderly farm couple.

Beset with his own life in near-shambles, Wallander begins the painstaking process of finding the killers with little more to go on than coincidence and one word, “foreign.”
Mankell weaves a tale filled with examining Sweden’s immigration crisis, elder care, opera, failed marriages, father-daughter estrangements, media antics, all weaved into a tightly written page-turner of a police procedural.

Mankell’s style is simple and head-on. It’s no wonder his Wallander books enjoy such acclaim. Television viewers may recall the PBS Mysteries series picking up the BBC production of the Wallander mysteries, starring Kenneth Branagh. The Swedish production of the series (which I prefer) is available on Netflix.

I told a friend once I had read the books – I lied. I had watched the programs and had every intention of eventually reading the books. Now I have read Book 1. I’m glad I did. I’m hooked. Can’t wait to get started on the next one.

Faceless Killers – A Mystery (Kurt Wallander Mystery Book 1) –  by Henning Mankell

5 stars out of 5.

Available in all formats everywhere.

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Check in every week for Book Review Wednesday. I’m reading and reviewing a book a week throughout 2018. Join me. Authors, if you have a book you would like reviewed, send me an email at joe@josephmarkbrewer.com.

NewAllBooks20184FB

Joseph Mark Brewer writes the Shig Sato mysteries. Mix up some Lieutenant Columbo and Kurt Wallander and you have an interesting new character in Shig Sato and a thrilling new series set in the heart of Tokyo. Click for your copy of The Gangster’s SonThe Thief’s MistakeTraitors & Lies, or Cat’s Meow. And check out Shig’s Readers Club to get a free copy of Tokyo Summer, the exciting Shig Sato prequel that tells the story of the events that led up to The Gangster’s Son.